Davao City to convert old Airport Terminal into a BPO Facility

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DAVAO CITY — Local officials here have agreed to develop and promote the old Davao City airport terminal in Sasa district, 10 kilometers from downtown, into a business process outsourcing (BPO) facility.

Councilor Peter T. Lavina, chairman of the committee on commerce and trade, said the original proposal to develop the old airport terminal into a cargo hub was dropped since it would require additional investment from the Civil Aviation Authority, which owns the property, and since existing cargo facilities at the new Davao International Airport remain underutilized.

“What remained of the old airport was just a shell and that’s all the BPO locators need; they will just refurbish the structure,” he said. “The old airport has been idle for the past four years now and is deteriorating.”

There were originally six to seven proposals for the old Davao airport, including a BPO center, an aviation school, a cargo logistics and trade center.

During the 8th Davao City Business Conference last July, the Davao business chamber presented Vice-Mayor Sara Z. Duterte a resolution to convince national officials to develop the old airport into a cargo and trade center. In the presentation of its resolution, Davao chamber president Simeon P. Marfori II had said the facility will remain an unused asset unless the government will set aside funding to develop it.

Bert P. Barriga, Jr., vice-president of the Davao ICT Council, projected a potential income of P70 million in five years once a call center locates at the old airport terminal with rent of just P250 per square meter, or about 40% of a regular rent in Manila. He said the whole property could reach about 60,000 square meters.

“The area is near residential subdivi-sionsour initial assessment is the area could provide an opportunity for local businesses to thrive because BPO requires support services like food stalls and entertainment,” he said. — Joel B. Escovilla

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~ by davaohive101 on November 4, 2008.

27 Responses to “Davao City to convert old Airport Terminal into a BPO Facility”

  1. BPO info network available soon

    A NETWORK, which will provide all the necessary information about the BPO industry in Davao Region, will soon be available to everyone.

    This was bared by Bert Barriga, vice-president of the ICT Davao Inc., saying the network will be dubbed as the Davao Region Geographic Information Network. Its Phase 1 is targeted to be completed when the year ends.

    http://www.sunstar.com.ph/static/dav/2008/11/06/bus/bpo.info.network.available.soon.html

  2. BPO SITE TO EARN 70 MILLION

    A PROJECTION of P70 million is expected to be generated within five years should the old Sasa Airport will be converted to a BPO site, an officer of the ICT Davao Inc. revealed.

    Bert Barriga, vice-president of the ICT Davao Inc., told business reporters during Tuesday’s edition of the Business Forum at the Medispa at SM City Davao, that the projected revenue to be generated was based on the leasable areas of the old Sasa Airport.

    http://www.sunstar.com.ph/static/dav/2008/11/06/bus/bpo.site.to.earn.p70.million.html

  3. ang layo kaya ng Sasa airport…

  4. HELP US PASS THE WORD!!! SAVE YOUNG DAVAOENOS’ DREAMS AND FUTURE.
    I am an employee from Western Wats.
    and fortunately still IN the company… However, in the coming week or two, I might be out…
    Yes… true, Western Wats is a good company… UNTA.
    Just imagine…only 6 hours of work… with free meal…. and you get p10k??
    Isn’t that great??! As compared to other call centers here in Davao who pays php6500++ to php8000++ as the basic pay… here’s how it is…
    COMPARISON
    Other Call Centers
    –8hrs-8.5hrs of work
    –BASIC PAY:
    p6500-8000/month
    –(NO FREE MEAL)
    –HARD ACCOUNTS
    Western Wats
    –6hrs of work ONLY—wow!!
    –BASIC PAY:
    p10,OOO/month–for Davao agents that’s way over board already.
    –FREE MEAL
    –SUPER Easy Accounts—-you just read, that’s it.
    COMPARISON
    Other Call Centers
    –Stable accounts.
    Meaning you have a fixed expected work to be done, which would mean you work full-shift.
    –LOWER taxable basic rate, but more NON-TAXABLE incentives.
    –Lower Basic rate means lesser tax…
    (Performance incentives like QA grades, meeting quotas, perfect attendance, etc.)
    -BIGGER night-differential rate.
    -with Night Allowance
    -Hazard Pay.
    – (for some, if not most) rice allowance, clothing allowance
    -with health benefits w/in 6months probationary period.
    -Team building in-compay’s expense.
    –respects the terms of your signed contract…
    Western Wats
    –Unstable account—no specific company handling and providing projects (jobs)
    Meaning NO project means NO job, NO job means NO work, NO work means NO pay.
    -We’re sent home, paid half-day—–at least. BUT being this way most of the times?? No way.
    –No Night allowance
    –SMALLER night differential (before I get P1,000+ with my previous call center job, now I only get P400)
    –Seasonal work load… Wats is done USING us during the US political season (we were doing political surveys then, not to mention the push polls LEANING on one candidate or party—out of the issue)
    –HIGH basic pay—P10,000.00— but don’t get hooked by the figures people.
    –Lately… since it’s been a month of always going on half-day—-what do we get?? P5,ooo for this month??
    –LESS (NEXT TO NONE) INCENTIVE
    –When other call centers give p1200 just for having a Perfect Attendance in a month, p1500 for good QA scores quarterly, and gift checks or gadgets for hitting Production… You only get it as one in Wats. If you have Perfect Attendance, above 85% QA grade and over (yes! Over) 100% production rate altogether, it’s only when you get to have P1000 on that month. Nice! After all your effort, that is only what you get… To compromise, if you fail one (1) or two (2) of the criteria and at least been able to pass one criteria, don’t worry… you still get a sachet of coffee, a lollipop, or a chocolate… there’s a lot to choose from.
    So Here’s The Main Thing…
    Since your Taxable rate with Wats, is P10,000 then the net pay you get for your pocket is lesser. With almost no additional pay and incentives, you actually get less than p10,000 a month. With other call centers, since you have a less taxable pay rate and a lot (I really mean a lot) of additional pay… you actually reach at least P10K, if not more…
    Now that the US political season is done, Western Wats Davao is receiving less (next to no) projects. And among 200+ agents available on the floor or 30 to 40 agents per team, they only need 2-3 agents per team to dial the minimal surveys available… which means, It’s another (mandated) half-day “option” for the rest (they always use the term “option” to at least waive that it’s on our own will to go on half-day when it’s really not). And lately, 3 to 4 agents are being terminated every week… Is it the agents’ fault for not being able to hit production if there is none to be produced??
    There were people who applied last September and October and was told that they pass and ready for training… and guess when their training will start??—-It would be On January or Febuary 2009. I believe nobody could wait that long, and I’d bet that most, if not all of those people have already looked or even hired to another jobs.
    Here are some comments on-line
    batang buotan Says:
    April 7, 2008 at 4:48 pm
    Western Wats is among the “pioneer” (BPO) company here in Cebu. However, in December 2007, many were surprised with the massive lay-offs of its employees.
    Some “ineffective” employees in any call center will be terminated. In any company, it happens that “ineffective” employees have to be terminated. However, what happened to Western Wats was very shocking because it was mass lay-off and according to reports, there was no clear reason for such mass lay-off.
    Bobby Nalzaro (GMA-Cebu) wrote in Sun Star Cebu:
    “Though Western Wats is an American firm, its management should follow our labor laws. There are rules to be followed in terminating employees but company officials, some of whom are Filipinos, refused to follow them. They dropped their kababayans like hot potatoes. This is oppression.”
    Please visit this link:http://www.sunstar.com.ph/static/ceb/2008/01/12/oped/bobby.nalzaro.saksi.html
    getdissapointed@wats Says:
    June 5, 2008 at 3:51 pm
    Western Wats is a company that really is the biggest data collection company. But late 2007 a lot of people got fired. They even ended up in the column of Bobby Nalzaro in Sunstar daily. They do pay well. 16k for b2c agents thats from 4am to 12pm and the b2b shift get as much as 22k but its either you are in the uk shift or the u.s. b2b shift. Free meals but no medical insurance till you are regularized. Just ask people in Cebu. Good luck in not getting dissapointed @wats.
    From davaohive101.com
    WWats sucks!!! they shouldn’t have gone here in Davao… they make and shatter davaoenos dreams… they make false hopes.
    wats hater said this on Your comment is awaiting moderation. November 28, 2008 at 12:39 pm
    (here are some clips of commentaries from SunStar Cebu)
    Wednesday, January 09, 2008
    Talk back: Western Wats issue
    By Suzan Sussie
    The US is indeed in economic turmoil. That probably explains why, despite President Arroyo’s claims of a stronger peso and a better economy, we see a lot of companies downsizing, i.e. laying off regular employees.
    Downsizing is a defensive strategy to protect company assets and preserve profits under unfavorable economic conditions.
    It is a given that businesses operate for profit. And it is management prerogative as to how to carry out such strategies to fulfill their duties as steward of company assets.
    However, in doing so, management must not prejudice the rights of employees or carry out their purposes to the detriment of others.
    Philippine labor laws specify the grounds for termination and procedures to carry those out. In carrying out its purposes, management must take care to abide by the substance of the law, not merely its form.
    My impression of the situation in Western Wats is such that management has not given the employees due notice when it terminated their employment. That’s bad and that really pisses me off.
    It might be an American firm but it is doing business in the Philippines. It should not only abide by our laws, but also RESPECT our culture and traditions.
    In my book, laying off employees during the holiday season is inhumane. Where’s the company’s sense of social responsibility in that?
    It’s high time that we, Filipinos, stand up and fight for what we believe is right.
    To the affected employees, if you believe your dismissal was unjust, seek reprieve in our legal system. Don’t just take it.
    If you don’t stand up and defend your rights, nobody will.
    Saturday, January 12, 2008
    Nalzaro: Layoffs of employees in call center, 2
    By Bobby Nalzaro
    Saksi
    I DID not expect that the article I wrote two weeks ago about the termination of the services of employees in Western Wats, an American call center based at the Mactan Export Processing Zone (Mepz) 2 in Lapu-Lapu City, would trigger reactions.
    Some of them criticized the decision of management, calling it inhuman because it was done during the Christmas holidays. Others defended the decision, saying the laid off employees were ineffective.
    Mike Cohen, a US-based journalist, even emailed me asking if the termination had something to do with the coming US presidential elections. I don’t think so.
    Until now, however, there has been no official word from the company’s higher ups as to the real reason behind the layoffs. The services of hundreds of employees were terminated before Christmas and more workers are expected to be retrenched.
    The firm’s US-based officials, including its new president, were here over the weekend but they refused to issue a statement. Sources said Western Wats, whose main headquarters is in Orem, Utah, was sold recently to another company, its third owner since it began operating in early 2000.
    Western Wats Philippines started its operation in 2003 with 300 employees. For the past years, it was doing well, employing some 1,700 employees. The questionable acts happened only last year.
    The services of new recruits, trained for as short as two weeks, were being terminated. Some of them were from Mindanao and other parts of the Visayas, all carrying the hope of ending up having a good paying job after relocating to Cebu.
    The employment contract of probationary employees specified that they will be evaluated after a month of training and then five months later to determine if they will be hired as regular employees. But most of them were laid off within two months.
    Last November, the company reduced the number of teams by moving some employees to other teams and terminating the services of others for no apparent reason.
    Some supervisors were demoted to the status of agents for lack of teams to handle. Others were told they were ineffective. This caused demoralization among the supervisors’ rank, prompting some of them to resign.
    Mass termination followed last December. The company said this was because of gross inefficiency. But an insider said there has never been a written standard when it comes to production that can be used as ground for termination. And even if there was, the employees should have been given due process before their services were terminated, especially the regular ones.
    What was insulting was that the employees were just verbally told about the termination when they reported for work. No official memorandum was issued about any violation they committed. Worse, there was no mention about separation pay or whatever benefits that can be claimed upon termination. That is why some dismissed employees went to the National Labor Relations Commission.
    Though Western Wats is an American firm, its management should follow our labor laws. There are rules to be followed in terminating employees but company officials, some of whom are Filipinos, refused to follow them. They dropped their kababayans like hot potatoes. This is oppression.
    FINAL SAY:
    LET’S NOT ALLOW THE CEBU INCIDENT TO HAPPEN TO US HERE IN DAVAO, FOR THOSE WHO WANT TO HAVE A GOOD, SUCESSFUL, HUMANE CALL CENTER EXPERIENCE, WESTERN WATS IS NOT THE PLACE… THEY PROMOTE CAPITALISM IN A VERY GREEDY AND SELFISH MANNER. LET’S WORK TOGETHER AND SAVE THE FUTURE OF OUR YOUNG DAVAOENOS. HELP US SPREAD THE WORD. I’M SPEAKING ON BEHALF OF ALL THE INNOCENT TERMINATED PEOPLE WHO CAN’T SPEAK OUT.

  5. i suggest that the old airport be converted into a convention center! or a trade center..its better that way//

  6. MERRY CHRISTMAS!!!

  7. hi..charles’ suggestion is better, just make the old DIA into a convention center… just like the Cebu International Convention Center (CICC). its a great landmark for davao if it pushes through raher than just a BPO building…

  8. The ultimate best proposal for the old Davao Airport at Sasa is an aeronautics specialty state college. I have designed already 10 specialty BS aeronautics-related programs for this school. These are:

    B.S. Aeronautical Engineering B.S. Aviation Safety Science
    B.S. Aircraft Eng’g Technology B.S. Aviation Maint Management
    B.S. Avionics Eng’g Technology B.S. A/c Systems Maintenance
    B.S. Engineering Physics (space science)
    B.S. Aviation Computer Science
    A.S. Aircraft Maintenance B.S. Avionics Technology

    I envisioned this school to be named the (“Daedalus”) DAEDALVS, The Davao Aeronautical Technological School, after the Greek Mythology of “Daedalus and Icarus,” of “success and failure” famed-story that is now part of literature. There is such a school in the U.S., the world famous Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University located at Daytona Beach, Florida, the first school that offered me M.S. Aerospace Engineering admission (12-16-1992). But I studied for 1 school year of my BSAE Deficiency Plan in my MSAE degree program at the California State University, Long Beach in 1999-2000. I went home because I have no scholarship.

    There will be no best proposal for the old airport except an aeronautics specialty college. Such large places are the study
    of urban planners and specialized architects. For me the place has the aura, atmosphere and character of an aeronautics specialty college like Embry-Riddle Aero. Univ., Parks College of Aviation, Engineering and Technology in St. Louis, Missouri and the former Northrop University located near Los Angeles Airport.

    It is now high time to establish modern (genuine) aeronautics in the Philippines since the airplane has been around for 105 years (Wright Brothers first successful powered flight: December 17, 1903).

    Please communicate with me. E-mail: d.delgra0776@yahoo.com.

    Engr. Darvin Delgra, BSME, MSAE grad student

  9. My proposal for the DAEDALVS is to hire imported faculty from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Florida, U.S.A., to teach here in Davao. This will be the start of genuine aeronautical education in our country. My scheme is that 20 imported teachers (2 for each department) will be hired through the sponsorship of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (Paris, France). Their salary will be in dollars because they will be coming back to the U.S. after their short 3-year stint here in our beautiful city. The rest of the teachers (general engineering, general education and support subjects) will be recruited from the local faculty source.

    Or better still, we will request Manny Pacquaio, world boxing champion, to aid us in the financial aspect of the establishment of the school as I suspect he is a serious philanthropist already. (How will he spend all those money?) In this way, he will have a lasting Legacy to our culture by aiding us all Filipinos to develop in a first-world field of science and technology that’s continually neglected by our government, even until now.

    Those imported faculty will teach only for 3 years when the upper-division major subjects will be then offered; after that our first graduates will take over. For our fledgling purposes, we can make do with fresh graduates from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, those with teaching ability. We will need also the assistance of the UNESCO (or Manny Pacquaio) for the acquisition of our imported state-of-the-art aero-laboratories equipment and current aerospace engineering books.

    It is now high time to establish a modern US-par aeronautics specialty college here in our 3rd world country; at least in some respects. It is never too late for us even if we lagged behind more than 100 years in aeronautical development compared to that of the U.S. Where will those better aeronautics youth of our country study? In those low-standard current aero schools of the Philippines? (NO OFFENSE MEANT.) With this I mean not piloting airplanes or aircraft maintenance, but design-oriented bachelor’s degree study in the mature field of aerospace engineering, although we will concentrate mostly in aeronautics; thus our course B.S. Aeronautical Engineering.

    Please communicate with me and join me in my cause. I can set up soon an e-group for our altruistic purposes. My e-mail: d.delgra0776@yahoo.com.

    Engr. Darvin Delgra, BSME, MSAE grad student

    P.S. The last course above is A.S. Avionics Technology (for
    avionics technicians; 2-year course)

  10. A CALL CENTER IS DEFINITELY NOT THE RIGHT PROPOSAL for the old Davao Airport at Sasa. It will be a case of “another Icarus,” a
    failure proposal for the this important facility. Only an aeronautics specialty college, specially a state college, is the right next occupant of the old airport.

    For one thing, the place is far from the city (10 Km.) And a BPO facility needs other offices to do business with. Also the place is very big because it was a former airport terminal. Does a BPO facility need such very big facility? Wake up Davaoenos! The next occupant of the old airport should only be an airport/ aviation-oriented business, educational or governmental operation.

    I don’t know why the proposal for an aviation school did not push through. But if it is only a piloting or pilot training school – a civil aviation school – it doesn’t need a very big building for such activity. I’ve heard about the Philippine State College of Aeronautics (Villamor Air Base, Pasay City, Manila) being interested to occupy the smaller old airport terminal, the former international terminal. Maybe this school is the one that proposed the civil aviation school. But what happened to their proposal? If we are to establish a quality aeronautics school, it should not be just another local aeronautics school, one that’s sorely lacking in the state-of-the-art. (AGAIN, NO OFFENSE MEANT. JUST A SOBER REALIZATION.)

    My proposal above should be heeded. We should strive and aim to establish a fledgling quality US-par aeronautics specialty college (at least in some respects) for the sake of the future of our talented aeronautics youth. Mind you, there are a lot of them here in the Philippines, even in Mindanao. My aims and goals for them with the detailed plans I made for the future (“Daedalus”) DAEDALVS, The Davao Aeronautical Technological School is to provide them with a quality Bachelor’s Degree aero education, one that will prepare them to qualify for admission to advanced study (M.S. and Ph.D.) in aeronautics/ aviation-related programs in the U.S. such as those of Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Florida.

    If you look at our neighboring countries such as Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia, they have pursued aeronautical development with their aircraft design, development and manufacturing programs, or aircraft parts manufacture. What about us? We can start with our humble efforts in genuine aeronautical education BEYOND aircraft piloting and aircraft maintenance which are basic to every country of the world. Even government people in Manila continually neglected this important field of aeronautical education. But I think this is not so much difficult to do. We only need confidence as a people and a 21st Century mindset, the Era of Aerospace and Computers.

    I’ve read in the internet that the current Global Financial Crisis did not affect employment opportunities in education, health care and accounting as least-affected sectors. So my proposal above is still very viable even with our present situation. In fact, we can still make slow development and progress rather than regression in our times today with my proposals and schemes.

    Please communicate with me and join me in my cause. My e-mail: d.delgra0776@yahoo.com.

    Engr. Darvin Delgra, BSME, MSAE grad student

  11. The old Davao Airport is particularly suited for an aeronautics specialty state college specially because of its location. Along the airport road, there are two buildings there that are also unused, one unfinished, the other unoccupied. These buildings are excellent for use as dormitories for the specialized aviation-oriented students of the future (“Daedalus”) DAEDALVS, The Davao Aeronautical Technological School. (Where will they study in genuine aeronautics?)

    To the south side of the old terminal (or to the left of the old terminal when seen along the airport road) there is a 7-hectare vacant lot that is also unused until now. I’ve heard that it is owned by a certain Mr. Bermejo, but he did not use or sell it until now. As I have said in my thesis above, such large places are the study of urban planners and specialized architects. Only my proposed aeronautics specialty college will occupy best the old airport terminal (and surrounding areas) and the adjacent 7-hectare currently-vacant lot. This lot is excellent for an athletic field and parade and review grounds for the DAEDALVS, and also for several new buildings (along the periphery) that will be needed as the school grows. The businesses and small stores that operated before near the terminal will also again flourish.

    Talking about outsourcing, this is also happening in aviation. In 1992 and 1997 there was these news in the national dailies about the American aerospace giant The Boeing Co. being interested to put up a maintenance center here in the Philippines, for airliners. I think this prospect and desire of Boeing is still present because this is “excellent economics.” The U.S. grew so large, notwithstanding the present Global Economic Crisis, that they need useful people all over the world, such as skilled aircraft maintenance personnel and properly-trained aircraft engineers. Their original plan to put up a maintenance center in Mactan Cebu Airport (1992) and the former Clark Air Base (1997) did not push through even though this project is not so high tech. But I believe the primary reason why it did not push through is our lack of properly trained aircraft engineers, because our culture neglected quality aeronautical development (specially education) until now.

    My aim and goal is the development of the whole airport and not just a portion of it. There are lots of vacant spaces along the periphery of the airfield which is excellent for the proposed maintenance center of The Boeing Co. of the U.S. (I am sure they are still interested in this prospect.) Our future “Daedalus” aeronautics specialty college will pave the way for the development of genuine aeronautical development in our country. Because our partnership with Boeing will also pave the way for our “inching in the state-of-the-art” in aeronautical development. Such as manufacture of aircraft parts, e.g., composite aircraft parts fabrication of less-critical aircraft components such as wheel-well doors, etc., and beyond. This scheme is precisely the path followed by less-advanced countries of the world wanting to join the prestigious aerospace manufacturing club.

    If we already have a core-group of aeronautical engineers with US-par aeronautical training (at least in some respects) then we can pursue genuine aeronautical development with my PROPOSED GOVERNMENT AERONAUTICS AGENCY (other than the CAAP, or Civil Aviation Authority of the Phlippines), concerned about aeronautics research and development. (The CAAP is concerned about aviation operations and regulations, use and maintenance, etc.) I envisioned this agency to be called the PAGA&SA or the Philippine Aviation General Aeronautics and Space Administration (the “space” name is just to complete the agency’s full name; but we will concentrate mostly in aeronautics and aviation research and development). The PAGA&SA will be like the former NACA of the U.S. which was the predecessor of the NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration). NACA stands for National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics; and the PAGA&SA I envisioned will be precisely like this agency. We need this agency very much and also we can employ many of our talented aeronautics youth who will be our future properly-trained aeronautical engineers or aircraft engineering technologists, etc.

    There is a lot of use of aerospace technology, even in ordinary life. Our lowly cell phone uses satellite technology to bounce radio signals in space; the same technology is used also in the internet and weather forecasting and even arable agricultural lands inventory (from space), etc., etc. Electronics miniaturization’s need is the most acute in aerospace applications where weight is a premium. (Aircraft components should be as light as possible.) I hope you see that the futuristic, even romantic, field of aerospace is not all about flying airplanes and spacecraft, going to the Moon and other planets, designing, developing and manufacturing aircraft and spacecraft and missiles, but that virtually all aspects of our daily life is affected by it. One of the best popular examples of its usage comes next.

    Windmill technology (called wind turbines in the modern sense) is really aeronautics or aerospace technology. Although the windmill or wind turbine will stay in the ground forever it employs aeronautics technology to the fullest, specially aerodynamics and aerospace structures (structural design and vibration analysis). This technology is much needed in our fuel-hungry times today more than ever. Because fuel oils will not last forever, we should conserve it the best we can, and one of the most popular ways to do it now is through this technology. But what are we Filipinos doing? We have neglected aeronautical development to the detriment of our culture’s economy, although we may not know it. I know of not one Filipino manufacturer of modern windmills, but in the U.S., in other advanced countries and mostly elsewhere, there are so many.

    IT IS NOW HIGH TIME FOR US TO DEVELOP IN GENUINE AERONAUTICS.

    May God in Jesus bless us all Filipinos in our endeavors, specially us Davaoenos!

    Engr. Darvin Delgra, BSME, MSAE grad student
    E-mail: d.delgra0776@yahoo.com

  12. The davao international airport is indeed a very big space to put up a big investment. the question is what investment? all the proposal were good.
    the old airport road has become so commercialized, big trucks rally with small tricycle transport. safety has to be addressed… the old airport is not a business center, if a convention center will be put there, it will only be used not so often. In fact, we still have the davao convention and trade center, if another convention center with an international class be built, it should be a the center of the metro. If a flying school will be put there, are there a lot of students who’ll enroll? yet the proposal is good because the area is really fit for aeronautical activities. further studies should be conducted as much as feasibility is concerned. this will prevent waste of money specially during this time of crisis. additional, it was a site of many death due to the davao airport bombing, however, it’s not that scary at all…

  13. AN AERONAUTICS SPECIALTY STATE COLLEGE IS NOT A FLYING SCHOOL.
    The name of the school I proposed (“Daedalus”) DAEDALVS, The Davao Aeronautical Technological School, implies it is an Engineering School (State College) specializing in Aeronautics.
    Although at the beginning it will offer only 3 engineering BS degree programs. The rest are BS and AS aviation courses.

    In fact a Flying course is not included in the courses I listed above. The ab initio (from the very beginning) flying training consists only of 1 semester of Ground School after which pilot training is commenced. The student pilot would then qualify for private pilot’s license after 50 hours of flying training and commercial pilot’s license after 200 hours of training. The hard fact is that ab initio flying training can be started right after high school with the student having a background in basic algebra and trigonometry among his or her general preparation.
    If you go to Manila, if you inspect the many private Flying Schools operating at the Manila Domestic Airport, their schools don’t need much space for their student’s instruction. But the old Davao Airport Terminal is very big and much fitting for an Aeronautics-specialty State College.

    In the U.S. they have a four-year BS degree course in flying (Professional Pilot program) which they typically call B.S. Aeronautical Studies or B.S. Aeronautical Science. This course will include many features of a typical BS degree program with flying training interspersed in between. Among the best programs are found at the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Florida and Parks College of Engineering, Aviation and Technology, Saint Louis, Missouri.

    As my answer to CJ’s questions above: “are there a lot of students who will entroll?”, A BIG YES. There are many aviation enthusiasts who want to pursue aeronautical training. But the better students are put off by the low quality Philippine aero schools currently in operation. I hope CJ read carefully the proposals and theses I wrote above. OUR COUNTRY SORELY NEEDS A US-PAR AERONAUTICS SPECIALTY COLLEGE FOR THE SAKE OF OUR TALENTED AERONAUTICS YOUTH WHO WISH TO PURSUE AN AERONAUTICS CAREER. I graduated in 1986 in B.S. Mechanical Engineering (the parent field of aeronautics) and I pursued aerospace engineering graduate study (MSAE) in the U.S (1999-2000; on extended/ expired leave from CSU, Long Beach). The University of Southeastern Philippines Mechanical Engineering Department’s Chairman Engr. Nelson Fuentes supposedly took as college course the BS Aeronautical Engineering as first choice as he told me. (By the way he is “No. 20 Board Topnotcher” in ME in 1986.) I can search many more cases in our field. I may do a survey in our local high schools here in Davao City about potential Aviation/ Aeronautics college students among our high school youth. I am confident I will find many among these idealistic young people.

    For me the old Davao Airport’s next occupant should only be an aviation/ airport-oriented business, educational or governmental operation and the BEST PROPOSAL is an Aeronautics-specialty
    State College. This is certainly not a waste of money; in fact in these of crisis we still can make slow growth and profit with my solid proposal.

    About feasibility study, I did informal research already and you may communicate with me with my e-mail below. I don’t know if those “further study” of which the University of the Philippines will yield anything. It’s been 5 years now and those officials and organizations concerned about the old airport has not put forward a viable proposal. They should heed my proposal for an aeronautics specialty college rather than exhaust their minds on other non-aviation proposal that are not fitting for the place. May God in Jesus bless us all Davaoenos.

    My e-mail: d.delgra@yahoo.com

    Engr. Darvin Delgra, BSME, MSAE grad student

  14. AN AERONAUTICS SPECIALTY STATE COLLEGE IS NOT A FLYING SCHOOL.
    The name of the school I proposed (“Daedalus”) DAEDALVS, The Davao Aeronautical Technological School, implies it is an Engineering School (State College) specializing in Aeronautics.
    Although at the beginning it will offer only 3 engineering BS degree programs. The rest are BS and AS aviation courses.

    In fact a Flying course is not included in the courses I listed above. The ab initio (from the very beginning) flying training consists only of 1 semester of Ground School after which pilot training is commenced. The student pilot would then qualify for private pilot’s license after 50 hours of flying training and commercial pilot’s license after 200 hours of training. The hard fact is that ab initio flying training can be started right after high school with the student having a background in basic algebra and trigonometry among his or her general preparation.
    If you go to Manila, if you inspect the many private Flying Schools operating at the Manila Domestic Airport, their schools don’t need much space for their student’s instruction. But the old Davao Airport Terminal is very big and much fitting for an Aeronautics-specialty State College.

    In the U.S. they have a four-year BS degree course in flying (Professional Pilot program) which they typically call B.S. Aeronautical Studies or B.S. Aeronautical Science. This course will include many features of a typical BS degree program with flying training interspersed in between. Among the best programs are found at the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Florida and Parks College of Engineering, Aviation and Technology, Saint Louis, Missouri.

    As my answer to CJ’s questions above: “are there a lot of students who will entroll?”, A BIG YES. There are many aviation enthusiasts who want to pursue aeronautical training. But the better students are put off by the low quality Philippine aero schools currently in operation. I hope CJ read carefully the proposals and theses I wrote above. OUR COUNTRY SORELY NEEDS A US-PAR AERONAUTICS SPECIALTY COLLEGE FOR THE SAKE OF OUR TALENTED AERONAUTICS YOUTH WHO WISH TO PURSUE AN AERONAUTICS CAREER. I graduated in 1986 in B.S. Mechanical Engineering (the parent field of aeronautics) and I pursued aerospace engineering graduate study (MSAE) in the U.S (1999-2000; on extended/ expired leave from CSU, Long Beach). The University of Southeastern Philippines Mechanical Engineering Department’s Chairman Engr. Nelson Fuentes supposedly took as college course the BS Aeronautical Engineering as first choice as he told me. (By the way he is “No. 20 Board Topnotcher” in ME in 1986.) I can search many more cases in our field. I may do a survey in our local high schools here in Davao City about potential Aviation/ Aeronautics college students among our high school youth. I am confident I will find many among these idealistic young people.

    For me the old Davao Airport’s next occupant should only be an aviation/ airport-oriented business, educational or governmental operation and the BEST PROPOSAL is an Aeronautics-specialty
    State College. This is certainly not a waste of money; in fact in these times of crisis we still can make slow growth and profit with my solid proposal.

    About feasibility study, I did informal research already and you may communicate with me with my e-mail below. I don’t know if those “further study” of which the University of the Philippines is tasked will yield anything. It’s been 5 years now and those officials and organizations concerned about the old airport has not put forward a viable proposal. They should heed my proposal for an aeronautics specialty college rather than exhaust their minds on other non-aviation proposal that are not fitting for the place. May God in Jesus bless us all Davaoenos.

    My e-mail: d.delgra@yahoo.com

    Engr. Darvin Delgra, BSME, MSAE grad student

  15. I would like to list again the college courses I proposed for the future “Daedalus”, The Davao Aeronautical Technological School which I envisioned to be the next occupant of the old Davao Airport. The DAEDALVS is an Engineering State College specializing in Aeronautics. These aeronautics-related B.S. degree programs are patterned after Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University’s unique programs (in its upper-division major courses, 4-year and 5-year subjects) combined with the traditional engineering subjects and general education and support courses here in our country. These are:

    1. Bachelor of Science in Aeronautical Engineering (5 years)
    2. Bachelor of Science in Aircraft Engineering Technology
    3. Bachelor of Science in Avionics Engineering Technology
    4. Bachelor of Science in Aviation Safety Science
    5. Bachelor of Science in Aviation Maintenance Management
    6. Bachelor of Science in Aircraft Systems Maintenance
    7. Associate in Science in Aircraft Maintenance (2 years)
    8. Associate in Science in Avionics Technology (2 years)
    I. Bachelor of Science in Engineering Physics* (space science)
    II. Bachelor of Science in Computer Science*

    *Next Degree Program to be offered in the future.

    A Flying course is not included in the courses to be offered in my future “Daedalus” Aeronautics College. I proposed the school to be a State College so the tuition and fees will fit the budget of poor and middle-class families with an aviation-oriented sibling.

    If you like to have a copy to inspect any of the BS Degree curriculums I made, please contact me with my e-mail address below and I will send you a copy, FREE.

    It is now high time for us Mindanaons to develop in genuine aeronautics! May God in Jesus bless us all Davaoenos.

    Engr. Darvin Delgra, BSME, MSAE grad student
    E-mail: d.delgra@yahoo.com

  16. I have prepared 5 more aeronautics-related BS degree curriculums that I envisioned to be the additional unique offerings of my aspired US-par (at least in some respects) aeronautics specialty college at the old Davao Airport, the “Daedalus”, The Davao Aeronautical Technological School. (My school will be called
    “Daedalus” for DAEDALVS – a Latin spelling, instead of the backward sounding “DATS”; NO OFFENSE MEANT. I got my school’s name style from “Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey” – a unique school name.) These courses are:

    1. B.S. Aeronautical Science (Professional Pilot, 5 years)
    2. B.S. Air Traffic Management
    3. B.S. Aviation Business Administration
    4. B.S. Human Factors Psychology (aerospace applications)
    5. B.S. Materials Engineering (aerospace materials)

    *The last course above BSCS is B.S. Aviation Computer Science.
    The AS Aircraft Maintenance (2 years) is for aircraft mechanics.
    The AS Avionics Technology (2 yrs) is for avionics technicians.

    I envisioned a future Flying course offering because the tarmac right next to the old Aiport terminal is “sayang”. It should be used by training airplanes and perhaps also training helicopters in the future. As any sane person should clearly see, THE PLACE IS FIT ONLY (yes, ONLY) FOR an aviation/ airport-oriented business, educational or governmental operation, specialty an aeronautics specialty state college.

    If the UNESCO or United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization will not help us in establishing the school, DAEDALVS, because of the present Global Economic Crisis, we have a “hero” from Mindanao which we can turn to. This is no other than Manny Pacquaio, the current World Boxing Champion.
    We can ask him to donate the funds needed for the establishment of the school since I suspect he is a serious Philanthropist already. For what, or how, will he spend all those money?

    In this way he will leave a LASTING LEGACY to us Filipinos, specially us Mindanaons, by aiding us all in developing in a first-world field of Science and Technology that’s continually neglected by our government, even until now – 105 years after the birth of the first successful airplane of the Wright Brothers, December 17, 1903.

    As for our deep gratefulness for his much-needed assistance, if ever, we may write or indicate in the school facade right next to the school’s name, DAEDALVS, The Davao Aeronautical Technological School, these words: “Established thru the Assistance of the Manny Pacquaio Foundation.”

    It’s really nice to be remembered in this way and Manny Pacquaio should know this early. The appropriate institutions or government agency specially the CAAP – Civil Aviation Authority of the Philippines – concerned about the unused facility should let him know his unusual role that’s not directly related to his boxing career, but needed anyway.

    Please review my suggested scheme above for the establishment
    of my envisioned US-par (at least in some respects) aeronautics specialty college at the long-vacated old Davao Airport.

    If you are interested to join me in my cause, please communicate with me with my e-mail address below.

    May God in Jesus bless us all Filipinos, specially us Davaoenos.

    Engr. Darvin Delgra, BSME, MSAE grad student
    E-mail: d.delgra@yahoo.com

  17. A Civil Aviation School is one of the proposals put forward for the utilization of the old Davao Airport. But a civil aviation school is another name for a flying school. A flying school is essentially a “driving school for airplane drivers” because a lot of those people who “fly” airplanes are not really pilots but airplane drivers. There is a a big difference.

    Airplane drivers “fly” their airplanes like land vehicles in the roads and highways of the sky and are unskilled “flyers.” Pilots, on the other hand, can comfortably (and enjoyably) fly in 3-dimensions if called for. Of course they can also function as airplane drivers (but airplane drivers cannot function like real pilots). These real pilots are fighter pilots, test pilots, aerobatic pilots and sailplane pilots, etc. They need a lot more training after ab initio (from the very beginning) flight training.

    If you care to visit perhaps the only Flight Training School left at the General Aviation area of the old Davao Airport, the one owned by Capt. Priscilio Paz you will find what a civil aviation/ flying school is like. They have only one small room filled with learning aids (smaller than a college classroom) and one or more training aircraft.

    This is why the proposal for a Civil Aviation School did not push through. Because the old Davao Airport is very big, it is suited ONLY for an aeronautics specialty college. And this college, I envisioned, again, to be named the “Daedalus” DAEDALVS, The Davao Aeronautical Technological School. I thought recently about a solid scheme on how to establish this unique specialty school.

    I suggest we will request Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University, Daytona Beach, Florida, to establish a International Campus here in Davao City. Embry-Riddle is a global institution with an International Campus located at training centers mostly in US military bases around the world, i.e., Air Force Base, Naval Base, etc. The DAEDALVS will be their first full-size international campus; hopefully, may God in Jesus bless us. The curriculums I’ve made are optimized for versatility and order; I perfected it in a very long time. It will have very minor changes as time passes if the school is established. Because I strived to make perfect curriculums, I discovered in my school curriculum collection that a considerable number of current school curriculums are just a helter-skelter (done without regard for order) list of not-so-coherent group of subjects (NO OFFENSE MEANT; JUST A SOBER IMPRESSION OR ANALYSIS). And many current curriculums need much improvement or development. I strive to change the status quo of Philippine aeronautical education.

    Those people in authority or power to influence the future of the old Davao Airport can continue searching in their minds for non-aviation proposals. But I bet these are all futile. They should heed my proposals and suggestions. It is now high time for us Filipinos, specially us Mindanaons specifically Davaoenos, to develop in genuine aeronautics starting in genuine aeronautical education. We have the unused facility of the old Davao Airport waiting for this aeronautics specialty school operation.

    Engr. Darvin Delgra, BSME, MSAE grad student
    E-mail: d.delgra@yahoo.com

  18. Let us make it as the Mindanao Museum for Culture and Arts! oh diba! 🙂

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  27. I have many more things to say (write) here in the future. Please wait for it.

    Engr. Darvin Delgra, BSME, MSAE grad student (CSU, Long Beach: on extended/ expired leave from 1999-2000 when I finished one (1) school-year or two (2) semesters of BSAE Deficiency-removal Plan studies. Hoping to resume my U.S. graduate study in 2017.)

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